The mission of The Department of Afro-American Research Arts and Culture to identify the global significance of the creative contributions pioneered by an international diaspora of Blackness
The Department of Afro American Research, Arts, and Culture's Archive is a subdivision of DAARAC that digitally preserves Afro American films. On this website, you may browse our archive that consists of film posters, screenshots, and movie synopsis. All information provided here is for research and reference purposes. We do not host full-length films on this website.

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Civil Rights Era

Between 1955 and 1969, there was a decrease of Afro American films made by Blacks in the United States. We know this period as the Civil Rights Era of Black Cinema. The Civil Rights Era of Black Cinema does not mean that the movies made were about the Civil Rights for Blacks. The era refers to a time in American history where equality and the push to end segregation were becoming a priority in the U.S. The Civil Rights era of Black Cinema represents the period, not the content of the films. The late 50s was seeing the final stages of Race Films, so this was a transition period for Black actors, writers, and directors. Part of this transition period was that the Black exploitation factor was becoming more prominent in films in the 1960s, especially towards the late 60s. There were not a lot of movies made during this period with Black actors as lead or films featuring an all-Black cast.

Nevertheless, the Civil Rights Era of Black Cinema paved the way for the new surge of films that was to become the Blaxploitation Era of the 1970s. The 1960s is a unique era consisting of films pushing the Black Male/Female love interesting to their White counterparts. This type of filmmaking was considered to be 'edgy' in cinema. The 1960s was also the decade of Jazzploitation. But for the most part, Sidney Poitier was the face of Blacks during the Civil Rights Era of Black Cinema.

The Civil Rights Era of Black Cinema is a very delicate period. The rarity of some of these films makes seeking them out worthwhile.


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Visit the Museum of Black Cult Cinema for additional information and digital media.