The mission of The Department of Afro-American Research Arts and Culture to identify the global significance of the creative contributions pioneered by an international diaspora of Blackness
The Department of Afro American Research, Arts, and Culture's Archive is a subdivision of DAARAC that digitally preserves Afro American films. On this website, you may browse our archive that consists of film posters, screenshots, and movie synopsis. All information provided here is for research and reference purposes. We do not host full-length films on this website.

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Showing posts with label 1931. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1931. Show all posts

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Hot Biskits (1931)















Starring:


Storyline
Spencer Williams's first film is a one-reel comedy short in which a rivalry between two men is played out in a high-stakes game of mini-golf.

The Darktown Revue (1931)









Starring:

Storyline
As a filmmaker, Oscar Micheaux was something of a firebrand, but his attitudes and methods were anything but predictable - often leveling criticism at certain strata of the African-American community. His most outrageous film is a traditional minstrel show - an olio of broad comedy and choral interludes. It is an acknowledge of minstrelsy as a defining tradition of African-American stage performance. If nothing else, The Darktown Revue is an invaluable historical document for recording on film the "Hard Shell Sermon" routine popularized by turn-of-the-century minstrel performer Amon Davis. but there is something else. True to form, Micheaux's depiction of a minister is not flattering. Davis's comic sermon of gibberish is a scathing satire of charismatic religion, made even more troubling by the fact that it is performed by a black man in blackface.By the same token, one cannot help but wonder if Micheaux was further provoking his audience by having the uplifting Donald Heywood choir open the film with a rendition of "Watermelon Time." 

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

The Exile (1931)

























Starring:

 Storyline
A young man named Jean (Stanley Morrell) in post-World War I Chicago falls in love with a beautiful girl named Edith (Eunice Brooks). He proposes to her, but realizes that she's involved in the rackets and won't leave them, so he goes back home to South Dakota, where he becomes a successful rancher. There he falls for a white girl, but guilt drives him back to Chicago, where he runs into Edith again, and they agree to marry. When Edith is later found murdered, Jean is blamed for the crime. 

This film was restored by Kino Lorber which was archived in the Library of Congress and released in a 5 disc box set: Pioneers of African American Cinema.