The mission of The Department of Afro-American Research Arts and Culture to identify the global significance of the creative contributions pioneered by an international diaspora of Blackness
The Department of Afro American Research, Arts, and Culture's Archive is a subdivision of DAARAC that digitally preserves Afro American films. On this website, you may browse our archive that consists of film posters, screenshots, and movie synopsis. All information provided here is for research and reference purposes. We do not host full-length films on this website.

Search DAARAC's Archive


Showing posts with label 1930. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1930. Show all posts

Friday, March 2, 2018

A Daughter of the Congo (1930) [Lost Film]

Starring:
Storyline
The central character is Lupelta, a beautiful mulatto girl who has been stolen as a baby and brought up among the savages of the jungle. The story opens with Lupelta on her way to the village to marry the tribal chief. She has paused to bathe in a brook when she is surrounded, captured ad made a prisoner of slave hunters. In the meantime, Captain Paul Dale, colored U.S. Army, and his first lieutenant have been sent by their government to operate a constabulary, and are on a reconnaissance. They encounter the slave hunters and promptly take their prisoners and rescues Lupelta. She is taken to a mission school where she succumbs to learning and soon becomes a popular maid in spite of her frequent inclination to revert to the wild life of the jungle.  

**This film is considered lost until notified otherwise**

Monday, February 19, 2018

Ol' King Cotton (1930)










Starring:

Storyline
George is a shiftless father and husband, who lets his wife and old mother in law do all the work at his tumbledown farm, preferring to sleep under a tree. His wife finally threatens him into finding a job moving cartons in a warehouse. 

Monday, January 15, 2018

Georgia Rose (1930) [Lost Film]


Starring:
Storyline
This picture was filmed by Harry Gant, former cameraman with the Lincoln Motion Picture Company. This story is about a minister's attempt to move his flock and daughter from Georgia to better farming land in the Midwest. While boarding up with a family, the minister's daughter is smitten by the love bug and led to corruption by her new lover's brother. Of course, she is saved in the nick of time by her new lover and forgiven by her father. 

**This film is considered lost until notified otherwise**

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Borderline (1930)















Starring:


Storyline
Adah, a black woman, has an affair with Thorne, a white man, much to the dismay of some of the prejudiced townsfolk and Thorne's wife, Astrid. Adah attempts a reconciliation with her man, Pete, but eventually leaves him and the town. Meanwhile, Astrid goes mad and cuts Thorne's face and arm with a knife, but then mysteriously dies. Thorne is tried but acquitted. Because of the events, the mayor sends Pete a letter asking him to leave town for the good of all concerned.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Hellbound Train (1930)



















Starring:


Storyline
This film is the work of self-taught filmmakers James and Eloyce Gist, African-American evangelists who employed cinema as a tool for their traveling ministry. Their surreal visual allegories were screened in churches and meeting halls, accompanied by sermon and the passing of a collection plate. Rather than having a linear story, the film is instead a catalog of iniquity, a car-by-car dramatization of the sins of the Jazz Age (including gambling, dancing, alcohol, and the mistreatment of animals), presided over by a honored devil, culminating in a colossal derailment (a model train tossed into a bonfire).  

This film was restored by Kino Lorber which was archived in the Library of Congress and released in a 5 disc box set: Pioneers of African American Cinema. 

Friday, September 13, 2013

Africa Speaks! (1930)






















Starring:
  • Harald Austin
  • Paul L. Hoefler
  • Lowell Thomas

IMDB.com

Hear the hoof-beats of the gnus and see a young boy chased down and killed by a lion (sans the screams)was what "Africa Speaks!" promised, and delivered. Filmed on the Colorado African Expedition of 1928, headed by Paul L. Hoefler, this film rose above the 'jungle-graph' films of the past---"Chang" excepted---because of the sound and not the views of the Dark Continent offered, albeit most of these were new views that some of the critics debated over whether or not some of them were staged. It contained: a locust swarm that devoured everything but the expedition camera; a visit to the duck-billed pygmy tribe in which the females of the tribe had discs inserted beneath their lips when very young and, as they grow older, larger discs replace the previous discs; an antelope---called and spelled illampa in the film---that jumps forty feet backward or forward when frightened and some slow-motion shots are used. "Africa Speaks!" showed Africa to be both dangerous and noisy.

In order to bring this important early sound era documentary into proper cultural and natural historic focus, one must bethink of the prodigious changes that have altered the face of Africa as well as its humanity and fauna during the more than 70 years since the film's production. One can only imagine the reaction of a 1930 audience which viewed the extraordinary events presented and filmed by Colorado-based explorer Paul Hoefler, including the death and mealtaking by a family of lions of one of Hoefler's expeditionary native assistants, total decimation of the expedition's surrounding flora by a massive winged horde of locusts, and remarkable animals and people of many varieties. Narrator Lowell Thomas' somewhat casual comments of events that could not have been greeted in such cavalier fashion at the time they occurred can be offputting, and his attempts at whimsy consistently fall as flat as the veldt being traversed, but withal the narration provides a raft of historically fascinating data. Hoefler's book of the same title, published shortly after the release of the film, differs insofar as the expedition actually travelled from east to west, rather than the reverse, but for purposes of visual impact actual events were edited in order to produce dramatic action.